Browse Source

doc: Use prompt more often

pleroma
Jan Tojnar 3 years ago
parent
commit
a3f2131eb6
  1. 10
      doc/coding-conventions.xml
  2. 18
      doc/functions/dockertools.xml
  3. 12
      doc/languages-frameworks/beam.xml
  4. 8
      doc/languages-frameworks/perl.xml
  5. 4
      doc/meta.xml
  6. 18
      doc/package-notes.xml
  7. 16
      doc/quick-start.xml
  8. 10
      doc/reviewing-contributions.xml
  9. 4
      doc/submitting-changes.xml
  10. 10
      nixos/doc/manual/administration/cleaning-store.xml
  11. 4
      nixos/doc/manual/administration/container-networking.xml
  12. 2
      nixos/doc/manual/administration/control-groups.xml
  13. 6
      nixos/doc/manual/administration/logging.xml
  14. 2
      nixos/doc/manual/administration/rollback.xml
  15. 4
      nixos/doc/manual/administration/service-mgmt.xml
  16. 4
      nixos/doc/manual/administration/store-corruption.xml
  17. 4
      nixos/doc/manual/administration/user-sessions.xml
  18. 10
      nixos/doc/manual/configuration/ad-hoc-packages.xml
  19. 8
      nixos/doc/manual/configuration/adding-custom-packages.xml
  20. 2
      nixos/doc/manual/configuration/declarative-packages.xml
  21. 16
      nixos/doc/manual/configuration/matrix.xml
  22. 10
      nixos/doc/manual/configuration/modularity.xml
  23. 6
      nixos/doc/manual/configuration/wireless.xml
  24. 2
      nixos/doc/manual/configuration/xfce.xml
  25. 8
      nixos/doc/manual/development/building-nixos.xml
  26. 20
      nixos/doc/manual/development/building-parts.xml
  27. 18
      nixos/doc/manual/development/running-nixos-tests-interactively.xml
  28. 8
      nixos/doc/manual/development/running-nixos-tests.xml
  29. 24
      nixos/doc/manual/development/sources.xml
  30. 12
      nixos/doc/manual/development/testing-installer.xml
  31. 10
      nixos/doc/manual/installation/installing-usb.xml
  32. 84
      nixos/doc/manual/installation/installing.xml
  33. 10
      nixos/doc/manual/man-nixos-generate-config.xml
  34. 38
      nixos/doc/manual/man-nixos-install.xml
  35. 12
      nixos/doc/manual/man-nixos-option.xml
  36. 40
      nixos/doc/manual/man-nixos-rebuild.xml
  37. 2
      nixos/doc/manual/release-notes/rl-1509.xml
  38. 38
      nixos/modules/services/databases/foundationdb.xml
  39. 4
      nixos/modules/services/databases/postgresql.xml
  40. 10
      nixos/modules/services/editors/emacs.xml
  41. 12
      nixos/modules/services/misc/gitlab.xml
  42. 2
      nixos/modules/services/misc/taskserver/doc.xml

10
doc/coding-conventions.xml

@ -921,7 +921,7 @@ src = fetchFromGitHub {
<para>
You can convert between formats with nix-hash, for example:
<screen>
$ nix-hash --type sha256 --to-base32 <replaceable>HASH</replaceable>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-hash --type sha256 --to-base32 <replaceable>HASH</replaceable>
</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
@ -1038,7 +1038,7 @@ patches = [ ./0001-changes.patch ];
<para>
Move to the root directory of the source code you're patching.
<screen>
$ cd the/program/source</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>cd the/program/source</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -1046,8 +1046,8 @@ $ cd the/program/source</screen>
If a git repository is not already present, create one and stage all of
the source files.
<screen>
$ git init
$ git add .</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>git init
<prompt>$ </prompt>git add .</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -1060,7 +1060,7 @@ $ git add .</screen>
<para>
Use git to create a diff, and pipe the output to a patch file:
<screen>
$ git diff > nixpkgs/pkgs/the/package/0001-changes.patch</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>git diff > nixpkgs/pkgs/the/package/0001-changes.patch</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
</orderedlist>

18
doc/functions/dockertools.xml

@ -480,9 +480,9 @@ pullImage {
<literal>nix-prefetch-docker</literal> command can be used to get required
image parameters:
<programlisting>
$ nix run nixpkgs.nix-prefetch-docker -c nix-prefetch-docker --image-name mysql --image-tag 5
</programlisting>
<screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix run nixpkgs.nix-prefetch-docker -c nix-prefetch-docker --image-name mysql --image-tag 5
</screen>
Since a given <varname>imageName</varname> may transparently refer to a
manifest list of images which support multiple architectures and/or
@ -491,17 +491,17 @@ $ nix run nixpkgs.nix-prefetch-docker -c nix-prefetch-docker --image-name mysql
By default it will match the OS and architecture of the host the command is
run on.
<programlisting>
$ nix-prefetch-docker --image-name mysql --image-tag 5 --arch x86_64 --os linux
</programlisting>
<screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-prefetch-docker --image-name mysql --image-tag 5 --arch x86_64 --os linux
</screen>
Desired image name and tag can be set using
<option>--final-image-name</option> and <option>--final-image-tag</option>
arguments:
<programlisting>
$ nix-prefetch-docker --image-name mysql --image-tag 5 --final-image-name eu.gcr.io/my-project/mysql --final-image-tag prod
</programlisting>
<screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-prefetch-docker --image-name mysql --image-tag 5 --final-image-name eu.gcr.io/my-project/mysql --final-image-tag prod
</screen>
</para>
</section>

12
doc/languages-frameworks/beam.xml

@ -131,8 +131,8 @@
in <literal>beamPackages</literal>, use the following command:
</para>
<programlisting>
$ nix-env -f &quot;&lt;nixpkgs&gt;&quot; -qaP -A beamPackages
<screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -f &quot;&lt;nixpkgs&gt;&quot; -qaP -A beamPackages
beamPackages.esqlite esqlite-0.2.1
beamPackages.goldrush goldrush-0.1.7
beamPackages.ibrowse ibrowse-4.2.2
@ -140,16 +140,16 @@ beamPackages.jiffy jiffy-0.14.5
beamPackages.lager lager-3.0.2
beamPackages.meck meck-0.8.3
beamPackages.rebar3-pc pc-1.1.0
</programlisting>
</screen>
<para>
To install any of those packages into your profile, refer to them by their
attribute path (first column):
</para>
<programlisting>
$ nix-env -f &quot;&lt;nixpkgs&gt;&quot; -iA beamPackages.ibrowse
</programlisting>
<screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -f &quot;&lt;nixpkgs&gt;&quot; -iA beamPackages.ibrowse
</screen>
<para>
The attribute path of any BEAM package corresponds to the name of that

8
doc/languages-frameworks/perl.xml

@ -47,13 +47,13 @@ foo = import ../path/to/foo.nix {
in <filename>all-packages.nix</filename>. You can test building a Perl
package as follows:
<screen>
$ nix-build -A perlPackages.ClassC3
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build -A perlPackages.ClassC3
</screen>
<varname>buildPerlPackage</varname> adds <literal>perl-</literal> to the
start of the name attribute, so the package above is actually called
<literal>perl-Class-C3-0.21</literal>. So to install it, you can say:
<screen>
$ nix-env -i perl-Class-C3
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -i perl-Class-C3
</screen>
(Of course you can also install using the attribute name: <literal>nix-env -i
-A perlPackages.ClassC3</literal>.)
@ -148,7 +148,7 @@ ClassC3Componentised = buildPerlPackage rec {
</para>
<screen>
$ nix-env -i nix-generate-from-cpan
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -i nix-generate-from-cpan
</screen>
<para>
@ -156,7 +156,7 @@ $ nix-env -i nix-generate-from-cpan
unpacks the corresponding package, and prints a Nix expression on standard
output. For example:
<screen>
$ nix-generate-from-cpan XML::Simple
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-generate-from-cpan XML::Simple
XMLSimple = buildPerlPackage rec {
name = "XML-Simple-2.22";
src = fetchurl {

4
doc/meta.xml

@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ meta = with stdenv.lib; {
The meta-attributes of a package can be queried from the command-line using
<command>nix-env</command>:
<screen>
$ nix-env -qa hello --json
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -qa hello --json
{
"hello": {
"meta": {
@ -70,7 +70,7 @@ $ nix-env -qa hello --json
<command>nix-env</command> knows about the <varname>description</varname>
field specifically:
<screen>
$ nix-env -qa hello --description
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -qa hello --description
hello-2.3 A program that produces a familiar, friendly greeting
</screen>
</para>

18
doc/package-notes.xml

@ -92,9 +92,9 @@ modulesTree = [kernel]
<para>
If needed you can also run <literal>make menuconfig</literal>:
<screen>
$ nix-env -i ncurses
$ export NIX_CFLAGS_LINK=-lncurses
$ make menuconfig ARCH=<replaceable>arch</replaceable></screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -i ncurses
<prompt>$ </prompt>export NIX_CFLAGS_LINK=-lncurses
<prompt>$ </prompt>make menuconfig ARCH=<replaceable>arch</replaceable></screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -142,8 +142,8 @@ $ make menuconfig ARCH=<replaceable>arch</replaceable></screen>
<para>
The generator is invoked as follows:
<screen>
$ cd pkgs/servers/x11/xorg
$ cat tarballs-7.5.list extra.list old.list \
<prompt>$ </prompt>cd pkgs/servers/x11/xorg
<prompt>$ </prompt>cat tarballs-7.5.list extra.list old.list \
| perl ./generate-expr-from-tarballs.pl
</screen>
For each of the tarballs in the <filename>.list</filename> files, the script
@ -160,8 +160,8 @@ $ cat tarballs-7.5.list extra.list old.list \
A file like <filename>tarballs-7.5.list</filename> contains all tarballs in
a X.org release. It can be generated like this:
<screen>
$ export i="mirror://xorg/X11R7.4/src/everything/"
$ cat $(PRINT_PATH=1 nix-prefetch-url $i | tail -n 1) \
<prompt>$ </prompt>export i="mirror://xorg/X11R7.4/src/everything/"
<prompt>$ </prompt>cat $(PRINT_PATH=1 nix-prefetch-url $i | tail -n 1) \
| perl -e 'while (&lt;>) { if (/(href|HREF)="([^"]*.bz2)"/) { print "$ENV{'i'}$2\n"; }; }' \
| sort > tarballs-7.4.list
</screen>
@ -210,7 +210,7 @@ $ cat $(PRINT_PATH=1 nix-prefetch-url $i | tail -n 1) \
often available. It is possible to list available Eclipse packages by
issuing the command:
<screen>
$ nix-env -f '&lt;nixpkgs&gt;' -qaP -A eclipses --description
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -f '&lt;nixpkgs&gt;' -qaP -A eclipses --description
</screen>
Once an Eclipse variant is installed it can be run using the
<command>eclipse</command> command, as expected. From within Eclipse it is
@ -250,7 +250,7 @@ packageOverrides = pkgs: {
available for installation using <varname>eclipseWithPlugins</varname> by
running
<screen>
$ nix-env -f '&lt;nixpkgs&gt;' -qaP -A eclipses.plugins --description
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -f '&lt;nixpkgs&gt;' -qaP -A eclipses.plugins --description
</screen>
</para>

16
doc/quick-start.xml

@ -9,8 +9,8 @@
<para>
Checkout the Nixpkgs source tree:
<screen>
$ git clone https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs
$ cd nixpkgs</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>git clone https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs
<prompt>$ </prompt>cd nixpkgs</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ $ cd nixpkgs</screen>
See <xref linkend="sec-organisation" /> for some hints on the tree
organisation. Create a directory for your package, e.g.
<screen>
$ mkdir pkgs/development/libraries/libfoo</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>mkdir pkgs/development/libraries/libfoo</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -34,8 +34,8 @@ $ mkdir pkgs/development/libraries/libfoo</screen>
as arguments, and returns a build of the package in the Nix store. The
expression should usually be called <filename>default.nix</filename>.
<screen>
$ emacs pkgs/development/libraries/libfoo/default.nix
$ git add pkgs/development/libraries/libfoo/default.nix</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>emacs pkgs/development/libraries/libfoo/default.nix
<prompt>$ </prompt>git add pkgs/development/libraries/libfoo/default.nix</screen>
</para>
<para>
You can have a look at the existing Nix expressions under
@ -180,7 +180,7 @@ $ git add pkgs/development/libraries/libfoo/default.nix</screen>
with some descriptive name for the variable, e.g.
<varname>libfoo</varname>.
<screen>
$ emacs pkgs/top-level/all-packages.nix</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>emacs pkgs/top-level/all-packages.nix</screen>
</para>
<para>
The attributes in that file are sorted by category (like “Development /
@ -193,7 +193,7 @@ $ emacs pkgs/top-level/all-packages.nix</screen>
To test whether the package builds, run the following command from the
root of the nixpkgs source tree:
<screen>
$ nix-build -A libfoo</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build -A libfoo</screen>
where <varname>libfoo</varname> should be the variable name defined in the
previous step. You may want to add the flag <option>-K</option> to keep
the temporary build directory in case something fails. If the build
@ -205,7 +205,7 @@ $ nix-build -A libfoo</screen>
<para>
If you want to install the package into your profile (optional), do
<screen>
$ nix-env -f . -iA libfoo</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -f . -iA libfoo</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>

10
doc/reviewing-contributions.xml

@ -153,11 +153,11 @@
nixpkgs-unstable for easier review by running the following commands
from a nixpkgs clone.
<screen>
$ git remote add channels https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs-channels.git <co
<prompt>$ </prompt>git remote add channels https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs-channels.git <co
xml:id='reviewing-rebase-1' />
$ git fetch channels nixos-unstable <co xml:id='reviewing-rebase-2' />
$ git fetch origin pull/PRNUMBER/head <co xml:id='reviewing-rebase-3' />
$ git rebase --onto nixos-unstable BASEBRANCH FETCH_HEAD <co
<prompt>$ </prompt>git fetch channels nixos-unstable <co xml:id='reviewing-rebase-2' />
<prompt>$ </prompt>git fetch origin pull/PRNUMBER/head <co xml:id='reviewing-rebase-3' />
<prompt>$ </prompt>git rebase --onto nixos-unstable BASEBRANCH FETCH_HEAD <co
xml:id='reviewing-rebase-4' />
</screen>
<calloutlist>
@ -197,7 +197,7 @@ $ git rebase --onto nixos-unstable BASEBRANCH FETCH_HEAD <co
request url.
</para>
<screen>
$ nix-shell -p nix-review --run "nix-review pr PRNUMBER"
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-shell -p nix-review --run "nix-review pr PRNUMBER"
</screen>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>

4
doc/submitting-changes.xml

@ -36,8 +36,8 @@
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
<screen>
$ git checkout 0998212
$ git checkout -b 'fix/pkg-name-update'
<prompt>$ </prompt>git checkout 0998212
<prompt>$ </prompt>git checkout -b 'fix/pkg-name-update'
</screen>
</para>
</listitem>

10
nixos/doc/manual/administration/cleaning-store.xml

@ -11,12 +11,12 @@
Nix’s <emphasis>garbage collector</emphasis> to remove old, unreferenced
packages. This is easy:
<screen>
$ nix-collect-garbage
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-collect-garbage
</screen>
Alternatively, you can use a systemd unit that does the same in the
background:
<screen>
# systemctl start nix-gc.service
<prompt># </prompt>systemctl start nix-gc.service
</screen>
You can tell NixOS in <filename>configuration.nix</filename> to run this unit
automatically at certain points in time, for instance, every night at 03:15:
@ -31,11 +31,11 @@ $ nix-collect-garbage
configurations. The following command deletes old roots, removing the ability
to roll back to them:
<screen>
$ nix-collect-garbage -d
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-collect-garbage -d
</screen>
You can also do this for specific profiles, e.g.
<screen>
$ nix-env -p /nix/var/nix/profiles/per-user/eelco/profile --delete-generations old
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -p /nix/var/nix/profiles/per-user/eelco/profile --delete-generations old
</screen>
Note that NixOS system configurations are stored in the profile
<filename>/nix/var/nix/profiles/system</filename>.
@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ $ nix-env -p /nix/var/nix/profiles/per-user/eelco/profile --delete-generations o
Nix store) is to run Nix’s store optimiser, which seeks out identical files
in the store and replaces them with hard links to a single copy.
<screen>
$ nix-store --optimise
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-store --optimise
</screen>
Since this command needs to read the entire Nix store, it can take quite a
while to finish.

4
nixos/doc/manual/administration/container-networking.xml

@ -11,10 +11,10 @@
<literal>10.233.0.0/16</literal>. You can get the container’s IPv4 address
as follows:
<screen>
# nixos-container show-ip foo
<prompt># </prompt>nixos-container show-ip foo
10.233.4.2
$ ping -c1 10.233.4.2
<prompt>$ </prompt>ping -c1 10.233.4.2
64 bytes from 10.233.4.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.106 ms
</screen>
</para>

2
nixos/doc/manual/administration/control-groups.xml

@ -16,7 +16,7 @@
<literal>systemd</literal> hierarchy, which is what systemd uses to keep
track of the processes belonging to each service or user session:
<screen>
$ systemd-cgls
<prompt>$ </prompt>systemd-cgls
├─user
│ └─eelco
│ └─c1

6
nixos/doc/manual/administration/logging.xml

@ -11,14 +11,14 @@
The command <literal>journalctl</literal> allows you to see the contents of
the journal. For example,
<screen>
$ journalctl -b
<prompt>$ </prompt>journalctl -b
</screen>
shows all journal entries since the last reboot. (The output of
<command>journalctl</command> is piped into <command>less</command> by
default.) You can use various options and match operators to restrict output
to messages of interest. For instance, to get all messages from PostgreSQL:
<screen>
$ journalctl -u postgresql.service
<prompt>$ </prompt>journalctl -u postgresql.service
-- Logs begin at Mon, 2013-01-07 13:28:01 CET, end at Tue, 2013-01-08 01:09:57 CET. --
...
Jan 07 15:44:14 hagbard postgres[2681]: [2-1] LOG: database system is shut down
@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ Jan 07 15:45:13 hagbard postgres[2500]: [1-1] LOG: database system is ready to
Or to get all messages since the last reboot that have at least a
“critical” severity level:
<screen>
$ journalctl -b -p crit
<prompt>$ </prompt>journalctl -b -p crit
Dec 17 21:08:06 mandark sudo[3673]: pam_unix(sudo:auth): auth could not identify password for [alice]
Dec 29 01:30:22 mandark kernel[6131]: [1053513.909444] CPU6: Core temperature above threshold, cpu clock throttled (total events = 1)
</screen>

2
nixos/doc/manual/administration/rollback.xml

@ -33,7 +33,7 @@
where <replaceable>N</replaceable> is the number of the NixOS system
configuration. To get a list of the available configurations, do:
<screen>
$ ls -l /nix/var/nix/profiles/system-*-link
<prompt>$ </prompt>ls -l /nix/var/nix/profiles/system-*-link
<replaceable>...</replaceable>
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 78 Aug 12 13:54 /nix/var/nix/profiles/system-268-link -> /nix/store/202b...-nixos-13.07pre4932_5a676e4-4be1055
</screen>

4
nixos/doc/manual/administration/service-mgmt.xml

@ -21,7 +21,7 @@
<command>systemd</command>. Without any arguments, it shows the status of
active units:
<screen>
$ systemctl
<prompt>$ </prompt>systemctl
-.mount loaded active mounted /
swapfile.swap loaded active active /swapfile
sshd.service loaded active running SSH Daemon
@ -33,7 +33,7 @@ graphical.target loaded active active Graphical Interface
You can ask for detailed status information about a unit, for instance, the
PostgreSQL database service:
<screen>
$ systemctl status postgresql.service
<prompt>$ </prompt>systemctl status postgresql.service
postgresql.service - PostgreSQL Server
Loaded: loaded (/nix/store/pn3q73mvh75gsrl8w7fdlfk3fq5qm5mw-unit/postgresql.service)
Active: active (running) since Mon, 2013-01-07 15:55:57 CET; 9h ago

4
nixos/doc/manual/administration/store-corruption.xml

@ -18,7 +18,7 @@
If the corruption is in a path in the closure of the NixOS system
configuration, you can fix it by doing
<screen>
# nixos-rebuild switch --repair
<prompt># </prompt>nixos-rebuild switch --repair
</screen>
This will cause Nix to check every path in the closure, and if its
cryptographic hash differs from the hash recorded in Nix’s database, the
@ -28,7 +28,7 @@
<para>
You can also scan the entire Nix store for corrupt paths:
<screen>
# nix-store --verify --check-contents --repair
<prompt># </prompt>nix-store --verify --check-contents --repair
</screen>
Any corrupt paths will be redownloaded if they’re available in a binary
cache; otherwise, they cannot be repaired.

4
nixos/doc/manual/administration/user-sessions.xml

@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
allows querying and manipulating user sessions. For instance, to list all
user sessions:
<screen>
$ loginctl
<prompt>$ </prompt>loginctl
SESSION UID USER SEAT
c1 500 eelco seat0
c3 0 root seat0
@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ $ loginctl
devices attached to the system; usually, there is only one seat.) To get
information about a session:
<screen>
$ loginctl session-status c3
<prompt>$ </prompt>loginctl session-status c3
c3 - root (0)
Since: Tue, 2013-01-08 01:17:56 CET; 4min 42s ago
Leader: 2536 (login)

10
nixos/doc/manual/configuration/ad-hoc-packages.xml

@ -9,7 +9,7 @@
With the command <command>nix-env</command>, you can install and uninstall
packages from the command line. For instance, to install Mozilla Thunderbird:
<screen>
$ nix-env -iA nixos.thunderbird</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -iA nixos.thunderbird</screen>
If you invoke this as root, the package is installed in the Nix profile
<filename>/nix/var/nix/profiles/default</filename> and visible to all users
of the system; otherwise, the package ends up in
@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ $ nix-env -iA nixos.thunderbird</screen>
Packages come from the NixOS channel. You typically upgrade a package by
updating to the latest version of the NixOS channel:
<screen>
$ nix-channel --update nixos
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-channel --update nixos
</screen>
and then running <literal>nix-env -i</literal> again. Other packages in the
profile are <emphasis>not</emphasis> affected; this is the crucial difference
@ -34,21 +34,21 @@ $ nix-channel --update nixos
their current versions in the NixOS channel. You can however upgrade all
packages for which there is a newer version by doing:
<screen>
$ nix-env -u '*'
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -u '*'
</screen>
</para>
<para>
A package can be uninstalled using the <option>-e</option> flag:
<screen>
$ nix-env -e thunderbird
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -e thunderbird
</screen>
</para>
<para>
Finally, you can roll back an undesirable <command>nix-env</command> action:
<screen>
$ nix-env --rollback
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env --rollback
</screen>
</para>

8
nixos/doc/manual/configuration/adding-custom-packages.xml

@ -14,8 +14,8 @@
xlink:href="http://nixos.org/nixpkgs/manual">Nixpkgs
manual</link>. In short, you clone Nixpkgs:
<screen>
$ git clone https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs
$ cd nixpkgs
<prompt>$ </prompt>git clone https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs
<prompt>$ </prompt>cd nixpkgs
</screen>
Then you write and test the package as described in the Nixpkgs manual.
Finally, you add it to <literal>environment.systemPackages</literal>, e.g.
@ -65,8 +65,8 @@ stdenv.mkDerivation rec {
</programlisting>
This allows testing the package easily:
<screen>
$ nix-build my-hello.nix
$ ./result/bin/hello
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build my-hello.nix
<prompt>$ </prompt>./result/bin/hello
Hello, world!
</screen>
</para>

2
nixos/doc/manual/configuration/declarative-packages.xml

@ -22,7 +22,7 @@
<para>
You can get a list of the available packages as follows:
<screen>
$ nix-env -qaP '*' --description
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -qaP '*' --description
nixos.firefox firefox-23.0 Mozilla Firefox - the browser, reloaded
<replaceable>...</replaceable>
</screen>

16
nixos/doc/manual/configuration/matrix.xml

@ -141,15 +141,15 @@ in {
<option>services.matrix-synapse.registration_shared_secret</option>. To
create a new user or admin, run the following after you have set the secret
and have rebuilt NixOS:
<programlisting>
$ nix run nixpkgs.matrix-synapse
$ register_new_matrix_user -k &lt;your-registration-shared-secret&gt; http://localhost:8008
New user localpart: &lt;your-username&gt;
Password:
Confirm password:
Make admin [no]:
<screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix run nixpkgs.matrix-synapse
<prompt>$ </prompt>register_new_matrix_user -k <replaceable>your-registration-shared-secret</replaceable> http://localhost:8008
<prompt>New user localpart: </prompt><replaceable>your-username</replaceable>
<prompt>Password:</prompt>
<prompt>Confirm password:</prompt>
<prompt>Make admin [no]:</prompt>
Success!
</programlisting>
</screen>
In the example, this would create a user with the Matrix Identifier
<literal>@your-username:example.org</literal>. Note that the registration
secret ends up in the nix store and therefore is world-readable by any user

10
nixos/doc/manual/configuration/modularity.xml

@ -106,21 +106,21 @@ The unique option `services.httpd.adminAddr' is defined multiple times, in `/etc
configuration option is. The command <option>nixos-option</option> allows you
to find out:
<screen>
$ nixos-option <xref linkend="opt-services.xserver.enable"/>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nixos-option <xref linkend="opt-services.xserver.enable"/>
true
$ nixos-option <xref linkend="opt-boot.kernelModules"/>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nixos-option <xref linkend="opt-boot.kernelModules"/>
[ "tun" "ipv6" "loop" <replaceable>...</replaceable> ]
</screen>
Interactive exploration of the configuration is possible using <command>nix
repl</command>, a read-eval-print loop for Nix expressions. A typical use:
<screen>
$ nix repl '&lt;nixpkgs/nixos>'
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix repl '&lt;nixpkgs/nixos>'
nix-repl> config.<xref linkend="opt-networking.hostName"/>
<prompt>nix-repl> </prompt>config.<xref linkend="opt-networking.hostName"/>
"mandark"
nix-repl> map (x: x.hostName) config.<xref linkend="opt-services.httpd.virtualHosts"/>
<prompt>nix-repl> </prompt>map (x: x.hostName) config.<xref linkend="opt-services.httpd.virtualHosts"/>
[ "example.org" "example.gov" ]
</screen>
</para>

6
nixos/doc/manual/configuration/wireless.xml

@ -37,7 +37,7 @@
If you are using WPA2 you can generate pskRaw key using
<command>wpa_passphrase</command>:
<screen>
$ wpa_passphrase ESSID PSK
<prompt>$ </prompt>wpa_passphrase ESSID PSK
network={
ssid="echelon"
#psk="abcdefgh"
@ -54,10 +54,10 @@ network={
or you can use it to directly generate the
<literal>wpa_supplicant.conf</literal>:
<screen>
# wpa_passphrase ESSID PSK > /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>wpa_passphrase ESSID PSK > /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf</screen>
After you have edited the <literal>wpa_supplicant.conf</literal>, you need to
restart the wpa_supplicant service.
<screen>
# systemctl restart wpa_supplicant.service</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>systemctl restart wpa_supplicant.service</screen>
</para>
</section>

2
nixos/doc/manual/configuration/xfce.xml

@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ Thunar:2410): GVFS-RemoteVolumeMonitor-WARNING **: remote volume monitor with db
Session and Startup settings panel. Alternatively, you can run this command
to do the same thing.
<programlisting>
$ xfconf-query -c xfce4-session -p /compat/LaunchGNOME -s true
<prompt>$ </prompt>xfconf-query -c xfce4-session -p /compat/LaunchGNOME -s true
</programlisting>
A log-out and re-log will be needed for this to take effect.
</para>

8
nixos/doc/manual/development/building-nixos.xml

@ -14,14 +14,14 @@
Default CD/DVD configurations are available inside
<filename>nixos/modules/installer/cd-dvd</filename>.
<screen>
$ git clone https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs.git
$ cd nixpkgs/nixos
$ nix-build -A config.system.build.isoImage -I nixos-config=modules/installer/cd-dvd/installation-cd-minimal.nix default.nix</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>git clone https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs.git
<prompt>$ </prompt>cd nixpkgs/nixos
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build -A config.system.build.isoImage -I nixos-config=modules/installer/cd-dvd/installation-cd-minimal.nix default.nix</screen>
</para>
<para>
Before burning your CD/DVD, you can check the content of the image by
mounting anywhere like suggested by the following command:
<screen>
# mount -o loop -t iso9660 ./result/iso/cd.iso /mnt/iso</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>mount -o loop -t iso9660 ./result/iso/cd.iso /mnt/iso</screen>
</para>
</chapter>

20
nixos/doc/manual/development/building-parts.xml

@ -8,8 +8,8 @@
With the command <command>nix-build</command>, you can build specific parts
of your NixOS configuration. This is done as follows:
<screen>
$ cd <replaceable>/path/to/nixpkgs/nixos</replaceable>
$ nix-build -A config.<replaceable>option</replaceable></screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>cd <replaceable>/path/to/nixpkgs/nixos</replaceable>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build -A config.<replaceable>option</replaceable></screen>
where <replaceable>option</replaceable> is a NixOS option with type
“derivation” (i.e. something that can be built). Attributes of interest
include:
@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ $ nix-build -A config.<replaceable>option</replaceable></screen>
<para>
A shortcut to build this is:
<screen>
$ nix-build -A system</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build -A system</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
@ -66,9 +66,9 @@ $ nix-build -A system</screen>
test whether the kernel and the initial ramdisk boot correctly, by using
QEMU’s <option>-kernel</option> and <option>-initrd</option> options:
<screen>
$ nix-build -A config.system.build.initialRamdisk -o initrd
$ nix-build -A config.system.build.kernel -o kernel
$ qemu-system-x86_64 -kernel ./kernel/bzImage -initrd ./initrd/initrd -hda /dev/null
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build -A config.system.build.initialRamdisk -o initrd
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build -A config.system.build.kernel -o kernel
<prompt>$ </prompt>qemu-system-x86_64 -kernel ./kernel/bzImage -initrd ./initrd/initrd -hda /dev/null
</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
@ -99,15 +99,15 @@ $ qemu-system-x86_64 -kernel ./kernel/bzImage -initrd ./initrd/initrd -hda /dev/
contain dots (e.g. <literal>httpd.service</literal>), you need to put
them between quotes, like this:
<screen>
$ nix-build -A 'config.systemd.units."httpd.service".unit'
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build -A 'config.systemd.units."httpd.service".unit'
</screen>
You can also test individual units, without rebuilding the whole system,
by putting them in <filename>/run/systemd/system</filename>:
<screen>
$ cp $(nix-build -A 'config.systemd.units."httpd.service".unit')/httpd.service \
<prompt>$ </prompt>cp $(nix-build -A 'config.systemd.units."httpd.service".unit')/httpd.service \
/run/systemd/system/tmp-httpd.service
# systemctl daemon-reload
# systemctl start tmp-httpd.service
<prompt># </prompt>systemctl daemon-reload
<prompt># </prompt>systemctl start tmp-httpd.service
</screen>
Note that the unit must not have the same name as any unit in
<filename>/etc/systemd/system</filename> since those take precedence over

18
nixos/doc/manual/development/running-nixos-tests-interactively.xml

@ -9,17 +9,17 @@
The test itself can be run interactively. This is particularly useful when
developing or debugging a test:
<screen>
$ nix-build nixos/tests/login.nix -A driver
$ ./result/bin/nixos-test-driver
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build nixos/tests/login.nix -A driver
<prompt>$ </prompt>./result/bin/nixos-test-driver
starting VDE switch for network 1
&gt;
<prompt>&gt;</prompt>
</screen>
You can then take any Perl statement, e.g.
<screen>
&gt; startAll
&gt; testScript
&gt; $machine->succeed("touch /tmp/foo")
&gt; print($machine->succeed("pwd")) # Show stdout of command
<prompt>&gt;</prompt> startAll
<prompt>&gt;</prompt> testScript
<prompt>&gt;</prompt> $machine->succeed("touch /tmp/foo")
<prompt>&gt;</prompt> print($machine->succeed("pwd")) # Show stdout of command
</screen>
The function <command>testScript</command> executes the entire test script
and drops you back into the test driver command line upon its completion.
@ -30,8 +30,8 @@ starting VDE switch for network 1
<para>
To just start and experiment with the VMs, run:
<screen>
$ nix-build nixos/tests/login.nix -A driver
$ ./result/bin/nixos-run-vms
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build nixos/tests/login.nix -A driver
<prompt>$ </prompt>./result/bin/nixos-run-vms
</screen>
The script <command>nixos-run-vms</command> starts the virtual machines
defined by test.

8
nixos/doc/manual/development/running-nixos-tests.xml

@ -12,12 +12,12 @@
xlink:href="https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs/blob/master/nixos/tests/login.nix">login.nix</filename>,
you just do:
<screen>
$ nix-build '&lt;nixpkgs/nixos/tests/login.nix>'
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build '&lt;nixpkgs/nixos/tests/login.nix>'
</screen>
or, if you don’t want to rely on <envar>NIX_PATH</envar>:
<screen>
$ cd /my/nixpkgs/nixos/tests
$ nix-build login.nix
<prompt>$ </prompt>cd /my/nixpkgs/nixos/tests
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build login.nix
running the VM test script
machine: QEMU running (pid 8841)
@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ machine: QEMU running (pid 8841)
fast, as no disk image needs to be created. Afterwards, you can view a
pretty-printed log of the test:
<screen>
$ firefox result/log.html
<prompt>$ </prompt>firefox result/log.html
</screen>
</para>
</section>

24
nixos/doc/manual/development/sources.xml

@ -11,10 +11,10 @@
modify NixOS, however, you should check out the latest sources from Git. This
is as follows:
<screen>
$ git clone https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs
$ cd nixpkgs
$ git remote add channels https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs-channels
$ git remote update channels
<prompt>$ </prompt>git clone https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs
<prompt>$ </prompt>cd nixpkgs
<prompt>$ </prompt>git remote add channels https://github.com/NixOS/nixpkgs-channels
<prompt>$ </prompt>git remote update channels
</screen>
This will check out the latest Nixpkgs sources to
<filename>./nixpkgs</filename> the NixOS sources to
@ -32,23 +32,23 @@ $ git remote update channels
not have caught up yet and you’ll have to rebuild everything from source.
So you may want to create a local branch based on your current NixOS version:
<screen>
$ nixos-version
<prompt>$ </prompt>nixos-version
17.09pre104379.6e0b727 (Hummingbird)
$ git checkout -b local 6e0b727
<prompt>$ </prompt>git checkout -b local 6e0b727
</screen>
Or, to base your local branch on the latest version available in a NixOS
channel:
<screen>
$ git remote update channels
$ git checkout -b local channels/nixos-17.03
<prompt>$ </prompt>git remote update channels
<prompt>$ </prompt>git checkout -b local channels/nixos-17.03
</screen>
(Replace <literal>nixos-17.03</literal> with the name of the channel you want
to use.) You can use <command>git merge</command> or <command>git
rebase</command> to keep your local branch in sync with the channel, e.g.
<screen>
$ git remote update channels
$ git merge channels/nixos-17.03
<prompt>$ </prompt>git remote update channels
<prompt>$ </prompt>git merge channels/nixos-17.03
</screen>
You can use <command>git cherry-pick</command> to copy commits from your
local branch to the upstream branch.
@ -58,7 +58,7 @@ $ git merge channels/nixos-17.03
tell <command>nixos-rebuild</command> about them using the
<option>-I</option> flag:
<screen>
# nixos-rebuild switch -I nixpkgs=<replaceable>/my/sources</replaceable>/nixpkgs
<prompt># </prompt>nixos-rebuild switch -I nixpkgs=<replaceable>/my/sources</replaceable>/nixpkgs
</screen>
</para>
<para>
@ -67,7 +67,7 @@ $ git merge channels/nixos-17.03
<replaceable>/my/sources</replaceable>/nixpkgs</command>, or change the
default by adding a symlink in <filename>~/.nix-defexpr</filename>:
<screen>
$ ln -s <replaceable>/my/sources</replaceable>/nixpkgs ~/.nix-defexpr/nixpkgs
<prompt>$ </prompt>ln -s <replaceable>/my/sources</replaceable>/nixpkgs ~/.nix-defexpr/nixpkgs
</screen>
You may want to delete the symlink
<filename>~/.nix-defexpr/channels_root</filename> to prevent root’s NixOS

12
nixos/doc/manual/development/testing-installer.xml

@ -8,15 +8,15 @@
Building, burning, and booting from an installation CD is rather tedious, so
here is a quick way to see if the installer works properly:
<screen>
# mount -t tmpfs none /mnt
# nixos-generate-config --root /mnt
$ nix-build '&lt;nixpkgs/nixos>' -A config.system.build.nixos-install
# ./result/bin/nixos-install</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>mount -t tmpfs none /mnt
<prompt># </prompt>nixos-generate-config --root /mnt
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build '&lt;nixpkgs/nixos>' -A config.system.build.nixos-install
<prompt># </prompt>./result/bin/nixos-install</screen>
To start a login shell in the new NixOS installation in
<filename>/mnt</filename>:
<screen>
$ nix-build '&lt;nixpkgs/nixos>' -A config.system.build.nixos-enter
# ./result/bin/nixos-enter
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-build '&lt;nixpkgs/nixos>' -A config.system.build.nixos-enter
<prompt># </prompt>./result/bin/nixos-enter
</screen>
</para>
</chapter>

10
nixos/doc/manual/installation/installing-usb.xml

@ -15,16 +15,16 @@
<note>
<title>On macOS</title>
<para>
<programlisting>
$ diskutil list
<screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>diskutil list
[..]
/dev/diskN (external, physical):
#: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
[..]
$ diskutil unmountDisk diskN
<prompt>$ </prompt>diskutil unmountDisk diskN
Unmount of all volumes on diskN was successful
$ sudo dd if=nix.iso of=/dev/rdiskN
</programlisting>
<prompt>$ </prompt>sudo dd if=nix.iso of=/dev/rdiskN
</screen>
Using the 'raw' <command>rdiskN</command> device instead of
<command>diskN</command> completes in minutes instead of hours. After
<command>dd</command> completes, a GUI dialog "The disk you inserted was

84
nixos/doc/manual/installation/installing.xml

@ -110,7 +110,7 @@
<listitem>
<para>
Create a <emphasis>GPT</emphasis> partition table.
<screen language="commands"># parted /dev/sda -- mklabel gpt</screen>
<screen language="commands"><prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mklabel gpt</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -118,14 +118,14 @@
Add the <emphasis>root</emphasis> partition. This will fill the disk
except for the end part, where the swap will live, and the space left in
front (512MiB) which will be used by the boot partition.
<screen language="commands"># parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary 512MiB -8GiB</screen>
<screen language="commands"><prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary 512MiB -8GiB</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
Next, add a <emphasis>swap</emphasis> partition. The size required will
vary according to needs, here a 8GiB one is created.
<screen language="commands"># parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary linux-swap -8GiB 100%</screen>
<screen language="commands"><prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary linux-swap -8GiB 100%</screen>
<note>
<para>
The swap partition size rules are no different than for other Linux
@ -140,8 +140,8 @@
the ESP (EFI system partition) as its <emphasis>/boot</emphasis>
partition. It uses the initially reserved 512MiB at the start of the
disk.
<screen language="commands"># parted /dev/sda -- mkpart ESP fat32 1MiB 512MiB
# parted /dev/sda -- set 3 boot on</screen>
<screen language="commands"><prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart ESP fat32 1MiB 512MiB
<prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- set 3 boot on</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
</orderedlist>
@ -172,21 +172,21 @@
<listitem>
<para>
Create a <emphasis>MBR</emphasis> partition table.
<screen language="commands"># parted /dev/sda -- mklabel msdos</screen>
<screen language="commands"><prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mklabel msdos</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
Add the <emphasis>root</emphasis> partition. This will fill the the disk
except for the end part, where the swap will live.
<screen language="commands"># parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary 1MiB -8GiB</screen>
<screen language="commands"><prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary 1MiB -8GiB</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
Finally, add a <emphasis>swap</emphasis> partition. The size required
will vary according to needs, here a 8GiB one is created.
<screen language="commands"># parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary linux-swap -8GiB 100%</screen>
<screen language="commands"><prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary linux-swap -8GiB 100%</screen>
<note>
<para>
The swap partition size rules are no different than for other Linux
@ -218,7 +218,7 @@
since this makes the file system configuration independent from device
changes. For example:
<screen>
# mkfs.ext4 -L nixos /dev/sda1</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>mkfs.ext4 -L nixos /dev/sda1</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -227,7 +227,7 @@
recommended to assign a label to the swap partition: <option>-L
<replaceable>label</replaceable></option>. For example:
<screen>
# mkswap -L swap /dev/sda2</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>mkswap -L swap /dev/sda2</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -242,7 +242,7 @@
it’s recommended to assign a label to the boot partition:
<option>-n <replaceable>label</replaceable></option>. For example:
<screen>
# mkfs.fat -F 32 -n boot /dev/sda3</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>mkfs.fat -F 32 -n boot /dev/sda3</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
@ -273,7 +273,7 @@
Mount the target file system on which NixOS should be installed on
<filename>/mnt</filename>, e.g.
<screen>
# mount /dev/disk/by-label/nixos /mnt
<prompt># </prompt>mount /dev/disk/by-label/nixos /mnt
</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
@ -287,8 +287,8 @@
<para>
Mount the boot file system on <filename>/mnt/boot</filename>, e.g.
<screen>
# mkdir -p /mnt/boot
# mount /dev/disk/by-label/boot /mnt/boot
<prompt># </prompt>mkdir -p /mnt/boot
<prompt># </prompt>mount /dev/disk/by-label/boot /mnt/boot
</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
@ -303,7 +303,7 @@
the build actions that it may spawn) may need quite a bit of RAM,
depending on your configuration.
<screen>
# swapon /dev/sda2</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>swapon /dev/sda2</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -325,11 +325,11 @@
The command <command>nixos-generate-config</command> can generate an
initial configuration file for you:
<screen>
# nixos-generate-config --root /mnt</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>nixos-generate-config --root /mnt</screen>
You should then edit <filename>/mnt/etc/nixos/configuration.nix</filename>
to suit your needs:
<screen>
# nano /mnt/etc/nixos/configuration.nix
<prompt># </prompt>nano /mnt/etc/nixos/configuration.nix
</screen>
If you’re using the graphical ISO image, other editors may be available
(such as <command>vim</command>). If you have network access, you can also
@ -412,7 +412,7 @@
<para>
Do the installation:
<screen>
# nixos-install</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>nixos-install</screen>
Cross fingers. If this fails due to a temporary problem (such as a network
issue while downloading binaries from the NixOS binary cache), you can
just re-run <command>nixos-install</command>. Otherwise, fix your
@ -439,7 +439,7 @@ Retype new UNIX password: ***</screen>
<para>
If everything went well:
<screen>
# reboot</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>reboot</screen>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@ -460,16 +460,16 @@ Retype new UNIX password: ***</screen>
You’ll probably want to create some user accounts as well, which can be
done with <command>useradd</command>:
<screen>
$ useradd -c 'Eelco Dolstra' -m eelco
$ passwd eelco</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>useradd -c 'Eelco Dolstra' -m eelco
<prompt>$ </prompt>passwd eelco</screen>
</para>
<para>
You may also want to install some software. For instance,
<screen>
$ nix-env -qa \*</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -qa \*</screen>
shows what packages are available, and
<screen>
$ nix-env -i w3m</screen>
<prompt>$ </prompt>nix-env -i w3m</screen>
install the <literal>w3m</literal> browser.
</para>
</listitem>
@ -489,19 +489,19 @@ $ nix-env -i w3m</screen>
<example xml:id="ex-partition-scheme-MBR">
<title>Example partition schemes for NixOS on <filename>/dev/sda</filename> (MBR)</title>
<screen language="commands">
# parted /dev/sda -- mklabel msdos
# parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary 1MiB -8GiB
# parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary linux-swap -8GiB 100%</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mklabel msdos
<prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary 1MiB -8GiB
<prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary linux-swap -8GiB 100%</screen>
</example>
<example xml:id="ex-partition-scheme-UEFI">
<title>Example partition schemes for NixOS on <filename>/dev/sda</filename> (UEFI)</title>
<screen language="commands">
# parted /dev/sda -- mklabel gpt
# parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary 512MiB -8GiB
# parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary linux-swap -8GiB 100%
# parted /dev/sda -- mkpart ESP fat32 1MiB 512MiB
# parted /dev/sda -- set 3 boot on</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mklabel gpt
<prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary 512MiB -8GiB
<prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart primary linux-swap -8GiB 100%
<prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- mkpart ESP fat32 1MiB 512MiB
<prompt># </prompt>parted /dev/sda -- set 3 boot on</screen>
</example>
<example xml:id="ex-install-sequence">
@ -509,17 +509,17 @@ $ nix-env -i w3m</screen>
<para>
With a partitioned disk.
<screen language="commands">
# mkfs.ext4 -L nixos /dev/sda1
# mkswap -L swap /dev/sda2
# swapon /dev/sda2
# mkfs.fat -F 32 -n boot /dev/sda3 # <lineannotation>(for UEFI systems only)</lineannotation>
# mount /dev/disk/by-label/nixos /mnt
# mkdir -p /mnt/boot # <lineannotation>(for UEFI systems only)</lineannotation>
# mount /dev/disk/by-label/boot /mnt/boot # <lineannotation>(for UEFI systems only)</lineannotation>
# nixos-generate-config --root /mnt
# nano /mnt/etc/nixos/configuration.nix
# nixos-install
# reboot</screen>
<prompt># </prompt>mkfs.ext4 -L nixos /dev/sda1
<prompt># </prompt>mkswap -L swap /dev/sda2
<prompt># </prompt>swapon /dev/sda2
<prompt># </prompt>mkfs.fat -F 32 -n boot /dev/sda3 # <lineannotation>(for UEFI systems only)</lineannotation>
<prompt># </prompt>mount /dev/disk/by-label/nixos /mnt
<prompt># </prompt>mkdir -p /mnt/boot # <lineannotation>(for UEFI systems only)</lineannotation>
<prompt># </prompt>mount /dev/disk/by-label/boot /mnt/boot # <lineannotation>(for UEFI systems only)</lineannotation>
<prompt># </prompt>nixos-generate-config --root /mnt
<prompt># </prompt>nano /mnt/etc/nixos/configuration.nix
<prompt># </prompt>nixos-install
<prompt># </prompt>reboot</screen>
</para>
</example>

10
nixos/doc/manual/man-nixos-generate-config.xml

@ -13,18 +13,18 @@
</refnamediv>
<refsynopsisdiv>
<cmdsynopsis>
<command>nixos-generate-config</command>
<command>nixos-generate-config</command>
<arg>
<option>--force</option>
</arg>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--root</option>
</arg>
<replaceable>root</replaceable>
</arg>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--dir</option>
@ -154,7 +154,7 @@
file systems on <filename>/mnt</filename> and
<filename>/mnt/boot</filename>, you would run:
<screen>
$ nixos-generate-config --root /mnt
<prompt>$ </prompt>nixos-generate-config --root /mnt
</screen>
The resulting file
<filename>/mnt/etc/nixos/hardware-configuration.nix</filename> might look
@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ $ nixos-generate-config --root /mnt
<para>
After installation, if your hardware configuration changes, you can run:
<screen>
$ nixos-generate-config
<prompt>$ </prompt>nixos-generate-config
</screen>
to update <filename>/etc/nixos/hardware-configuration.nix</filename>. Your
<filename>/etc/nixos/configuration.nix</filename> will

38
nixos/doc/manual/man-nixos-install.xml

@ -13,72 +13,72 @@
</refnamediv>
<refsynopsisdiv>
<cmdsynopsis>
<command>nixos-install</command>
<command>nixos-install</command>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>-I</option>
</arg>
<replaceable>path</replaceable>
</arg>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--root</option>
</arg>
<replaceable>root</replaceable>
</arg>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--system</option>
</arg>
<replaceable>path</replaceable>
</arg>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--no-channel-copy</option>
</arg>
</arg>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--no-root-passwd</option>
</arg>
</arg>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--no-bootloader</option>
</arg>
</arg>
<arg>
<group choice='req'>
<group choice='req'>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--max-jobs</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>-j</option>
</arg>
</group> <replaceable>number</replaceable>
</arg>
<arg>
<option>--cores</option> <replaceable>number</replaceable>
</arg>
<arg>
<option>--option</option> <replaceable>name</replaceable> <replaceable>value</replaceable>
</arg>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--show-trace</option>
</arg>
</arg>
<arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--help</option>
@ -255,12 +255,12 @@
on an <literal>ext4</literal> file system created in
<filename>/dev/sda1</filename>:
<screen>
$ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1
$ mount /dev/sda1 /mnt
$ nixos-generate-config --root /mnt
$ # edit /mnt/etc/nixos/configuration.nix
$ nixos-install
$ reboot
<prompt>$ </prompt>mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1
<prompt>$ </prompt>mount /dev/sda1 /mnt
<prompt>$ </prompt>nixos-generate-config --root /mnt
<prompt>$ </prompt># edit /mnt/etc/nixos/configuration.nix
<prompt>$ </prompt>nixos-install
<prompt>$ </prompt>reboot
</screen>
</para>
</refsection>

12
nixos/doc/manual/man-nixos-option.xml

@ -13,19 +13,19 @@
</refnamediv>
<refsynopsisdiv>
<cmdsynopsis>
<command>nixos-option</command>
<command>nixos-option</command>
<arg>
<option>-I</option> <replaceable>path</replaceable>
</arg>
<arg>
<option>--verbose</option>
</arg>
<arg>
<option>--xml</option>
</arg>
<arg choice="plain">
<replaceable>option.name</replaceable>
</arg>
@ -103,13 +103,13 @@
<title>Examples</title>
<para>
Investigate option values:
<screen>$ nixos-option boot.loader
<screen><prompt>$ </prompt>nixos-option boot.loader
This attribute set contains:
generationsDir
grub
initScript
$ nixos-option boot.loader.grub.enable
<prompt>$ </prompt>nixos-option boot.loader.grub.enable
Value:
true

40
nixos/doc/manual/man-nixos-rebuild.xml

@ -13,39 +13,39 @@
</refnamediv>
<refsynopsisdiv>
<cmdsynopsis>
<command>nixos-rebuild</command><group choice='req'>
<command>nixos-rebuild</command><group choice='req'>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>switch</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>boot</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>test</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>build</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>dry-build</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>dry-activate</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>edit</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>build-vm</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>build-vm-with-bootloader</option>
</arg>
@ -54,33 +54,33 @@
<arg>
<option>--upgrade</option>
</arg>
<arg>
<option>--install-bootloader</option>
</arg>
<arg>
<option>--no-build-nix</option>
</arg>
<arg>
<option>--fast</option>
</arg>
<arg>
<option>--rollback</option>
</arg>
<arg>
<option>--builders</option> <replaceable>builder-spec</replaceable>
</arg>
<sbr />
<arg>
<group choice='req'>
<group choice='req'>
<arg choice='plain'>
<option>--profile-name</option>
</arg>
<arg choice='plain'>