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Alexander Boettcher 44adc3c404 tool: use grub2 instead of grub1 for iso boot 5 years ago
..
boot_dir tool: use grub2 instead of grub1 for iso boot 5 years ago
image tool: use grub2 instead of grub1 for iso boot 5 years ago
load tool/boot: add chain_loader 'unzip' 5 years ago
log run: update RISC-V run script support 5 years ago
power_off run: add Xen support 5 years ago
power_on tool: use grub2 instead of grub1 for iso boot 5 years ago
README run: rename powerplug to netio 7 years ago
amt.inc run: modularize run tool 8 years ago
depot.inc run: add create_tar_from_depot_binaries function 5 years ago
genode.xsd tool: add unscoped_label to xml schema 5 years ago
grub2.inc tool: use grub2 instead of grub1 for iso boot 5 years ago
iso.inc tool: use grub2 instead of grub1 for iso boot 5 years ago
load.inc run: modularize run tool 8 years ago
log.inc run: modularize run tool 8 years ago
power_netio.inc run: rename powerplug to netio 7 years ago
qemu.inc Introduce 'spec' subdirectories to outline aspects 7 years ago
run tool/run: link core with debug symbols optionally 5 years ago
spike.inc riscv: run tool support for spike 7 years ago
xen.inc run: add Xen support 5 years ago

README



===================
The Genode run tool
===================

Introduction
############

The run tool is used to configure, build, and execute so-called run scripts.
These run scripts include a scenario or test-case of Genode components and
subsystems. Its core functionality is split into various modules to accommodate
a variety of different execution environments. These modules provide the
implementation of a given step in the sequence of execution of a run script.
These steps are:

* Building the corresponding components
* Wrapping the components in a format suitable for execution
* Preparing the target systems
* Executing the scenario
* Collecting any output

After the run script was executed successfully, the run tool will print the
string 'Run script execution successful.". This message can be used to check
for the successful completion of the run script when doing automated testing.

The categories of modules are formed by existing requirements such as automated
testing on a variety of different hardware platforms and are based
on the above-named steps:

:boot_dir:
These modules contain the functionality to populate the boot directory
and are specific to each kernel. It is mandatory to always include the
module corresponding to the used kernel.

:image modules:
These modules are used to wrap up all components used by the run script
in a specific format and thereby to prepare them for execution.
Depending on the used kernel, there are different formats. With these
modules, the creation of ISO and disk images is also handled.

:load modules:
These modules handle the way the components are transfered to the
target system. Depending on the used kernel there are various options
to pass on the components. Loading from TFTP or via JTAG is handled
by the modules of this category.

:log modules:
These modules handle how the output of a currently executed run script
is captured.

:power_on modules:
These modules are used for bringing the target system into an defined
state, e.g., by starting or rebooting the system.

:power_off modules:
These modules are used for turning the target system off after the
execution of a run script.

When executing a run script, only one module of each category must be used.


Usage
#####

To execute a run script a combination of modules may be used. The combination
is controlled via the RUN_OPT variable used by the build framework. Here are a
few common exemplary combinations:

Executing NOVA in Qemu:

!RUN_OPT = --include boot_dir/nova \
! --include power_on/qemu --include log/qemu --include image/iso

Executing NOVA on a real x86 machine using AMT for resetting the target system
and for capturing the serial output while loading the files via TFTP:

!RUN_OPT = --include boot_dir/nova \
! --include power_on/amt --power-on-amt-host 10.23.42.13 \
! --power-on-amt-password 'foo!' \
! --include load/tftp --load-tftp-base-dir /var/lib/tftpboot \
! --load-tftp-offset-dir /x86 \
! --include log/amt --log-amt-host 10.23.42.13 \
! --log-amt-password 'foo!'

Executing fiasco.OC on a real x86 machine using AMT for resetting, USB serial
for output while loading the files via TFTP:

!RUN_OPT = --include boot_dir/foc \
! --include power_on/amt --amt-host 10.23.42.13 --amt-password 'foo!' \
! --include load/tftp --tftp-base-dir /var/lib/tftpboot \
! --tftp-offset-dir /x86 \
! --include log/serial --log-serial-cmd 'picocom -b 115200 /dev/ttyUSB0'

Executing hw on a rpi using NETIO powerplug to reset the hardware, JTAG to load
the image and USB serial to capture the output:

!RUN_OPT = --include boot_dir/hw \
! --include power_on/netio --power-on-netio-host 10.23.42.5 \
! --power-on-netio-user admin \
! --power-on-netio-password secret \
! --power-on-netio-port 1
! --include power_off/netio --power-off-netio-host 10.23.42.5 \
! --power-off-netio-user admin \
! --power-off-netio-password secret \
! --power-off-netio-port 1
! --include load/jtag \
! --load-jtag-debugger /usr/share/openocd/scripts/interface/flyswatter2.cfg \
! --load-jtag-board /usr/share/openocd/scripts/interface/raspberrypi.cfg \
! --include log/serial --log-serial-cmd 'picocom -b 115200 /dev/ttyUSB0'


Module overview
###############

A module consist of a expect/TCL source file located in one of the existing
directories of a category. It is named implicitly by its location and the
name of the source file, e.g. 'image/iso' is the name of the image module
that creates an ISO image.

The source file contains one mandatory procedure:

* run_<module> { <module-args> }
The procedure is called if the step at hand is executed by the
run tool. If its execution was successful, it returns true and
otherwise false. Certain modules may also call exit on failure.

A module may have arguments, which are by convention prefixed with the name
of the source file, e.g. 'power_on/amt' may have an argument called
'--power-on-amt-host'. If the argument passes on a value the value must be
made accessible by calling an equally named procedure, e.g.
'--power-on-amt-host' becomes 'proc amt_host { }'.
Thereby a run script or a run environment can access the value of the argument
in a defined way without the use of a global variable by using
'[power_on_amt_host]'. Also arguments without a value may be queried in this
way. '--image-uboot-gzip' becomes '[image_uboot_use_gzip]'.
In addition to these procedures, a module may have any number of public
procedures. They may be used after the presence of the particular module that
contains them is verified. For this reason the run tool provides a procedure
called 'have_include', that performs this check. For example the presence of
the 'load/tftp' module is checked by calling '[have_include "load/tftp"]'.